Why did this round of democratic transition fail?

One way or another, we thought that 2011 finally debunked the oft-repeated claims of Arab exceptionalism as an “explanation” for reluctance to begin a democratic transformation.

In that year, the streets and city squares witnessed massive protests, not against any specific policy but against the regime at large, focusing on despotism and corruption.

The people’s frustration was compounded by what was by now common knowledge and indeed common characteristics between Arab regimes; dynasties emerged even in republics aligned with new classes of corrupt business elites and cronies of all sorts and security apparatus encroachment on public and private life.

See more: One way or another, we thought that 2011 finally debunked the oft-repeated claims of Arab exceptionalism as an “explanation” for reluctance to begin a democratic transformation.

In that year, the streets and city squares witnessed massive protests, not against any specific policy but against the regime at large, focusing on despotism and corruption.

The people’s frustration was compounded by what was by now common knowledge and indeed common characteristics between Arab regimes; dynasties emerged even in republics aligned with new classes of corrupt business elites and cronies of all sorts and security apparatus encroachment on public and private life.